Category Archives: Hiking

Pine Log Creek Trail

A nice 5 mile double-loop walk through the woods north of Lake Allatoona in the northeast Georgia mountains. The trail begins East of Rydal in Bartow County. The information sign at the trail head says the area is filled with history: The trail head was apparently once the location of a massive Cherokee town that was home to numerous Cherokee chieftains and was visited by Spanish explorer De Soto in 1570.

The payoff is a beautiful, crystal-clear quarry lake. It’s an oddly small quarry (and not very deep) but it is built into the side of a mountain and offers great views and rock climbing.

“Western” (?) Ireland: Cashel

We were supposed to go to Cork today, but it was so darn crowded we jumped on the M and went up to Cashel instead. The Rock of Cashel is beautiful and as expected, but the ruins of the Hore Abbey, a former Benedictine Abbey that is both well preserved and available to run through, was the highlight. So what if it was Central Ireland.

The Rock of Cashel.
Hore Abbey.
Cashel Rock through an opening at Hore Abbey.

Western Ireland: Mizen’s Three Castles Head

As the Normans conquered Ireland 1,000 years ago, the O’Mahony Clan retreated to the furthest tip of the Mizen and built a Norman-style castle to defend themselves. They were no dummies, building at a spot where sea cliffs were on one side and Dunlough Lake on the other. It was never conquered. Today it makes for a great, spooky place in the middle of nowhere. A great payoff for just 4 km over the hills.


Western Ireland: Beara Peninsula

Beara is empty and deserted and wonderful. We could see the tour buses across the Kenmare Bay on the Ring of Kerry. The roads are tiny, and somewhat crazy, but the scenery is beautiful. At the tip is the only cable car in all of Ireland, a quick 10 minute trip over the Atlantic Ocean (!) from Lambs Head to Dursey Island.

Western Ireland: Cuas Pier Caves

An unexpected find on the Beara Peninsula (the one tour buses aren’t allowed on). It involved a crazy drive even by Irish standards, but was well worth it. We hiked after visiting and when we came back by two hours later the tide had come in so much the caves were inaccessible.